To run a " J " Bracket ( Turbo Bracket ) or not ?

Turbo Keith

TURBO KEITH
Sep 16, 2015
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New Albany , Ms
I am thinking about running a turbo blanket on my turbo but I cant with the J bracket , Is it ok to remove it being its for the turbo shield and I know the turbo bolts to it also . Just wondering how much support it does give the turbo bracket does support the turbo . Thanks for the input Fellows
 

Dhos1

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Apr 14, 2012
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I’m no expert, but I asked the same ? sometime ago and got mixed reviews. I chose not to run mine. Been about 2 years now, I haven’t had any issues.
 
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RUQWKNF

KEEPER OF SECRETS
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May 26, 2001
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Here's the deal.
The sole purpose of that bracket, other than something to mount the heat shield to, is too help relieve the weight of the turbo on the header. Without the J bracket, the full weight of the turbo is out there bouncing around when the header starts to get hot, starts to glow cherry red under WOT and pliable. Eventually, this will heat fatigue the headers, especially if stock, you will see cracks start to form around the bulges/folds of the main tube and where the primary tubes are welded to the main tube. I have been screaming it for years, as I've seen a bunch of cars with a cracked passengers side header caused by not running the stock heat shield, "J" bracket. Cars that are not driven often, or only raced and put back in the garage will definitely take a lot longer to crack the header. But a street car that get's abused weekly / monthly will crack a lot sooner. So, IMHO, for longevities sake, you gotta run that bracket.

More food for thought, stock headers can be upwards of 34 years old if they are from an early "86 model. Typically produced in late "85 for the "86 models is not uncommon. And we all know the steel used, was barely passable back when they were new. If you choose not to run a turbo heat shield, at least do something to fab up a similar bracket, or alter the stock one so that the turbo's weight is still supported. No matter which headers you run.... they will absolutely love you for running any type of turbo bracket. It was the very first thing I put back on my current car when I got it and all 4 of mine have had the stock bracket. Pic attached are some of the weak spots on the stock header that I've seen crack before.

stk hdr.jpg



Just my O2's worth.

-Patrick-
 

NY Twin Turbo

All the good stuff.....Times 2.
Dec 10, 2014
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Westchester NY
Here's the deal.
The sole purpose of that bracket, other than something to mount the heat shield to, is too help relieve the weight of the turbo on the header. Without the J bracket, the full weight of the turbo is out there bouncing around when the header starts to get hot, starts to glow cherry red under WOT and pliable. Eventually, this will heat fatigue the headers, especially if stock, you will see cracks start to form around the bulges/folds of the main tube and where the primary tubes are welded to the main tube. I have been screaming it for years, as I've seen a bunch of cars with a cracked passengers side header caused by not running the stock heat shield, "J" bracket. Cars that are not driven often, or only raced and put back in the garage will definitely take a lot longer to crack the header. But a street car that get's abused weekly / monthly will crack a lot sooner. So, IMHO, for longevities sake, you gotta run that bracket.

More food for thought, stock headers can be upwards of 34 years old if they are from an early "86 model. Typically produced in late "85 for the "86 models is not uncommon. And we all know the steel used, was barely passable back when they were new. If you choose not to run a turbo heat shield, at least do something to fab up a similar bracket, or alter the stock one so that the turbo's weight is still supported. No matter which headers you run.... they will absolutely love you for running any type of turbo bracket. It was the very first thing I put back on my current car when I got it and all 4 of mine have had the stock bracket. Pic attached are some of the weak spots on the stock header that I've seen crack before.

View attachment 336518


Just my O2's worth.

-Patrick-
Keith, everything Pat has said above is dead on. I learned this a long time ago when I had a stock set-up.

And it is exactly for this reason that when I fabbed up my set-up, I made 2 brackets that independently support and suspend the turbos in place. My headers can be completely removed and the turbos will just hang there . Not a single ounce of additional weight should be added to glowing red-hot steel.

Keep the J.
 

seedling

Well-Known Member
Jun 17, 2012
688
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Baton Rouge, LA
Here's the deal.
The sole purpose of that bracket, other than something to mount the heat shield to, is too help relieve the weight of the turbo on the header. Without the J bracket, the full weight of the turbo is out there bouncing around when the header starts to get hot, starts to glow cherry red under WOT and pliable. Eventually, this will heat fatigue the headers, especially if stock, you will see cracks start to form around the bulges/folds of the main tube and where the primary tubes are welded to the main tube. I have been screaming it for years, as I've seen a bunch of cars with a cracked passengers side header caused by not running the stock heat shield, "J" bracket. Cars that are not driven often, or only raced and put back in the garage will definitely take a lot longer to crack the header. But a street car that get's abused weekly / monthly will crack a lot sooner. So, IMHO, for longevities sake, you gotta run that bracket.

More food for thought, stock headers can be upwards of 34 years old if they are from an early "86 model. Typically produced in late "85 for the "86 models is not uncommon. And we all know the steel used, was barely passable back when they were new. If you choose not to run a turbo heat shield, at least do something to fab up a similar bracket, or alter the stock one so that the turbo's weight is still supported. No matter which headers you run.... they will absolutely love you for running any type of turbo bracket. It was the very first thing I put back on my current car when I got it and all 4 of mine have had the stock bracket. Pic attached are some of the weak spots on the stock header that I've seen crack before.

View attachment 336518


Just my O2's worth.

-Patrick-
My thoughts exactly! Patrick might know about this, as I haven’t seen this on another Turbo Regal. However, when I had the BGC extended SLIC on my car it had another bracket that came off the front of my cover and attached to the SLIC. And when I switched to the Kenny Bell fmic I noticed that I could feel very minor difference. Not quite a vibration, but, it doesn’t feel as smooth as it did before I lost the extra brace from the slic to my front cover. Not sure if this was a BGC deal or who made it but it was a simple design that could easily be replicated without any fabrication even. Just a piece of aluminum flat bar is all.

Anyways, maybe Patrick can give you more on that. But, I’m thinking about adding more bracing (not less)! Just my opinion though.


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seedling

Well-Known Member
Jun 17, 2012
688
493
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Baton Rouge, LA
I forgot to add that my factory stock “original” headers made it 93,000 miles without ever having even a hairline crack in them (no repairs of any sorts that I’m aware of)! Unfortunately for me, within 300 miles of removing the additional Bowling Green Customs extra brace (from front of t cover down to slic), my headers cracked. Coincidence or not? We’ll never know now, but, sure looks suspicious.


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