About how much do High Performance Technicians get paid?

Tony87gn

New Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2003
Im almost out of high school and Im very interested in a career like this. Just want to know what kind of pay to expect when I graduate.
 
Tony, it's like most any job in life. You will start out low in most cases and have to work and learn your way up. I had a quick service tech at GM that started as a helper (he had his degree already). He was at that for over 2 years and then had a chance to get his own position as a tech. At that point he was 23 and was making over $100k a year. So you have to prove yourself and learn along the way, and then take your chance and make the move up.

Mark
 
Thanks for the response. Thats exactly what I wanted to know. I wouldnt mind at all being a helper for awhile before getting the position I desired, maybe one of you older fellas out there that owns a buisness could recruit me when im ready ;)
 
That is the attitude Tony. I don't know of one person that is sucessful that didn't start out on or near the bottom of the ladder.
 
That's the problem with a lot of trades these days there are a lot of people getting paid way to much.There is no way an auto tech should be making 100K a year.That's why little old ladies pay 400 bucks for a brake job.
 
Depends on how good you are at the work.
Also depends if the shop pays you FLAT rate or Hourly.

You are not going to make big money without some sacrifice.
 
When you consider the amount of constant training these guys go thru and the amount of money they have to invest in tools and equipment to do their jobs, I would say they definately earn every penney of their money. In order for them to do that kind of volumn, they have to work they rear ends off, not take lunch, and work 10 to 12 hours a day. If they have the desire to do it, they cn earn it.
I don't see why you would say there is no way they should make that much. Why not? As far as prices go, any of our work and most dealers, give senior discounts. So that little old lady would pay less than you even.
 
That's the problem with a lot of trades these days there are a lot of people getting paid way to much.There is no way an auto tech should be making 100K a year.That's why little old ladies pay 400 bucks for a brake job.

Im not talking about being an auto tech that services little old ladies and such. I want to work on mostly high performance applications, like a lot of custom work.
 
There are other trades that have all those same requirments yet not near the compensation.I'm not bashing your trade just saying what makes what an auto tech does worth so much more than anything else.
 
Thats how I got started and I'm still at the bottom but the best part about it is being able to fix your own cars and it really helps with GN's because most of the time there's always something to fix. Plus the shop I work at is a mom and pop shop so we don't charge tons of money to fix anything. Working the way up the ladder is the way to go!!!!
 
The main thing Nisnutz is that the tools and equipment is always upgrading, the investment in training constantly changing. It takes a lot of extra time and money off job for these guys to truly stay up to date to do their jobs. I used to think it was absurd at the money they made also, but they truly earn it. To me it's a lot easier to understand their pay versus like plumbing, or a dock worker. Not deminishing what they do, but it's a similar thing.
 
So do you think that they should make more than an aircraft mechanic? They have to buy their own tools,tons of training,not to mention lots more responsibility.
 
You guys are arguing over a moot point...your AVERAGE tech makes no where near 100k dollars a year. It will vary greatly depending on where you live but 30-50k is probably a pretty good range.

When you are young and starting out you will be lucky and I mean LUCKY to make 25k a year...once you get certifications and experience then the sky is the limit but the average is FAR less than the 100k that you guys are arguing about. Again...pay will vary greatly depending on the area of the country as the cost of living dictates wages. If you expect to work at Meineke and make 100k then you are on crack.
 
Wow Blown it's hard to keep a guy making only that money out here. Guess the best thing to do is check in different regions of the country to see what the techs average. The $100k area can be done, but you have to work for it. You are right that most don't make that, but our lowest earning tech made over $65k my last year at the dealership. I do know you would be making far better money at a dealership than in the private sector in most cases. That and the training is more intense.
 
I agree but I'm at the bottom and make 20k a year I'm just saying that there's no end to it if you keep up in the trade. Plus my boss pays for all of my training but the part of buying new tools all of the time kinda stinks. I'm just glad that in todays world I have a job and that I make money and I enjoy what I do.
 
Originally posted by 2quiktocare
Wow Blown it's hard to keep a guy making only that money out here. Guess the best thing to do is check in different regions of the country to see what the techs average. The $100k area can be done, but you have to work for it. You are right that most don't make that, but our lowest earning tech made over $65k my last year at the dealership. I do know you would be making far better money at a dealership than in the private sector in most cases. That and the training is more intense.

California is a different planet Mark. ;)

My brother in law is a master tech that builds transmissions for a big dealership in Augusta Georgia. He has been there 12 years and makes about 35k dollars a year. That might make you sick but then again you can buy a 2000 square foot house on a couple acres for about 100k here too.

I moved here two years ago from the Boston area....in Boston my same brother in law would likely be making 70-75k as the cost of living is dramatically higher and the cost of wages rises in step with it. It's very dependent on where you live and the certifications that you acquire. If you are going to be a brake and undercar kind of guy then you will work your arse off to make decent money....driveability and diagnostics is where the big money is at...but then again the cost of your toolbox rises dramatically too. A lot of people forget that it doesn't matter how much you make....it's how much you keep that counts. :cool:
 
To work on a winning team, is often no more then room and board, unless your the driver, or crew chief.
Doing R+D for a major corp., again is low age, unless your the genius in charge.

Both can be the most rewarding work you can ever do. To work with a National Championship team even in the SCCA can be an amazing adventure.

Being an Agency Mechanic, and working flat rate is about being good. Get to where you're excellent, and you can make a real nice income. Flat rate is flat rate, and there are parts exchangers, and then there are mechanics.

Excellence is always paid well, from a Tuba player in an ochestra, to Lead Mechanic at an agency.
I spent about 10 years paying my dues, and learning alot at some low paying jobs, but when I desided to make a comfortable living doing mechanics, I did just that.

You also need to realise, being a mechanic is hard on the body also, standing on concrete floors, the use of impact tools, all wear on the legs, feet, wrists, and fingers. So you'll also want to plan what to do after being a mechanic, ie service manager, etc..

In concert with being a mechanic is the people side of things. You have to be either a people person, or like headaches. If you want to stay on a team and be a specilist in some small area you can be of the hermit type, but other then that you have to be somewhat of a team player, IMO.

And as an agency mechanic, I earned more then any of my A+P mechanic friends, but, I probably could have earned a similiar amount in that realm.
 
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