Anyone into AR's?

~JM~

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Many years ago I used to go out shooting with a buddy of mine who owned an SKS. I enjoyed shooting that rifle & admired the Russian round. Every once in a while that ole SKS firing pin would fail to retract resulting in a double or triple tap. That was kind of exciting.
 
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Powertechn2

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Would you mind explaining what some of the common modifications are & why they are performed?

Thanks
Most common are simple things. Like swapping the mil spec handguards to a free-float handguard. Keymod vs m lok is a choice that varies from person to person. It is a way to attach different accessories like lights, quick detach sling mounts etc. A handguard changes the feel and adds versatility.

Triggers are common to swap. Most mil-spec triggers have a gritty feel, over-travel, and a high pull weight. I prefer 3-3.5 lb triggers. I have one rifle with a 2 stage adjustable. The two stage allows you to come up on the second stage, then it is just a slight increase in pull weight before the magic happens. The second stage has shorter travel, increases accuracy in some situations. Not for quick shots really more for longer range accuracy. Most drop in triggers require anti rotation pins. Keeps the pins from rotating and walking out as there isn't a spring locking them in anymore.

Buttstocks are often swapped. Same thing as a handguard, different feel. Ergonomics, etc. Some have better cheek rests. Some are fully adjustable for the height and width, as well as length fine tuning, like the Magpul PRS. I like minimilist stocks. Again, personal preference. I don't really need a $250stock for hitting paper.

Then you get into muzzle brakes, which lowers the felt recoil and speed of follow up shots.

Also the charge handles. There are many. I have a few ambi handles as I shoot lefty. Also ambi safety levers, short throw etc. Ambi mag releases... These just make it easier for a lefty to shoot, but are not necessary.

Those are the most common swapped items.
 
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~JM~

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Thanks.

Who makes quality lowers & uppers?

What barrel length is most preferred?

What about 300 Whisper/Blackout interchange?
 
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Powertechn2

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Thanks.

Who makes quality lowers & uppers?

What barrel length is most preferred?

What about 300 Whisper/Blackout interchange?
I have done a 300 blackout build, as for interchangeability, you pretty much can just swap uppers back and forth as you wish.

For lower receivers, it is personal preference. Billet is nice, but not necessary. I have a few billet lowers and uppers. I can't say they are really worth the extra price though.

I have a few Anderson lowers, for the price they are great quality. There is also a company in Washington SSA, they have nice lowers, and also sell Anderson, Aero, etc. Their branded lowers tend to have a tight magwel, but it isn't horrible. Pricing from them is great. They had a deal on an assembled Anderson for a while, came ready to install an upper on. Think it was about $150 + shipping and transfer fee. Not sure what they have in stock now, Surplusammo.com

For uppers there are many companies. All depends on what you want. Only company I can say to stay away from is Palmetto State Armory. Bought 2 kits from them on an easter sale for a buddy. One has a completely loose barrel nut. Was supposedly test fired even. They refused to just swap it and had to send it back and wait about 3 weeks. They both are super tight, and keymod mounts don't line up correctly.

For assembled uppers, CBC industries has been great. Feed ramps in the receiver match perfect, are assembled CORRECTLY, and any issues they were quick to resolve. Had one that they sent with the wrong twist rate barrel, they had it back to me in about 5 days total from the day it went out to the day it came back. They included a free mag to compensate. They have a super light handguard from Hera, which is super light and has been top notch quality. It does get hot fast though.

If you want to build an upper on the cheap and don't mind having to clean up feed ramps, and waiting a loonnggg time for shipping, Delta Team Tactical isn't bad. Great pricing, just as I said, their upper kits need some tinkering to be perfect. Mainly just matching and polishing the feed ramps. They are about the cheapest around, if you like to tinker, and don't want to shell out a wad of cash for a good plinker.

If you want a kit where you can have several different uppers, BCA is pretty good too. They had a kit with 300, 5.56, and I think 7.62x39 all in one kit. Not sure if they still have it, it is a special that they emailed me about a while ago.

These are all the decent priced companies. There are a few that are midrange, but quality is about the same. Such as Apoc Armory. Then you get into higher end stuff and can spend $1000 on just an upper, like Bravo company.

I mostly build my uppers myself. Not hard, and I like knowing everything is assembled properly. Most assembled uppers I get are for buds builds. Of the companies I listed CBC seemed to be the standout for quality and service.


Uppers and parts do not require transfer/ffl, however lowers are the serialized part, aka the actual gun. Those need a transfer/paperwork to be done by a dealer.

Barrel length most common is 16". Shorter and it is an sbr and needs atf paperwork/stamp/fees. I have several 16", 18", and one 24".
 

Frederickdav

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A few years ago when the libs were crying about "those evil black rifles" , I customized a Ruger 10/22. Turned it into a pretty nice "evil black rifle". One of the things I like about AR's is the many uppers available. My 223/556 AR also has a 5.45 upper. Like the OP stated, winter time in Michigan can get a little boring. I'm totally disabled so the days of playing in the snow are done. So, winter is reloading time. Load 'em up all winter......empty 'em all summer.
 
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~JM~

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...I never got much into sa revolvers, primarily due to the recoil. After shooting a few, and acquiring the blackhawk, and seeing how the recoil is a slightly to moderately uncomfortable backward rotation, along with how the grip just never really seemed to fit me well...
Check out how these Ruger Bisley grip panels have been re-contoured. This is how S/A grips should be shaped.

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Powertechn2

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That would definitely make a huge difference. I will have to look into those. I don't shoot the Blackhawk much, primarily due to the feel of it... Looks like a grip change is in order.
 

pro69

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Had my 1st AR15 built for me by a friend. He suggested some parts and I told him what I liked and the "look" I wanted. This is the result. 5.56/.223,still need a scope. Any suggestions,without breaking the bank.
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Powertechn2

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Had my 1st AR15 built for me by a friend. He suggested some parts and I told him what I liked and the "look" I wanted. This is the result. 5.56/.223,still need a scope. Any suggestions,without breaking the bank.View attachment 300834 View attachment 300835
All depends on how far out you want to reach accurately, and your budget.

By budget, meaning if you want to spend less than $100 and shoot at an indoor range, or have $1500 and want to shoot accurately to a few hundred yards... In low light conditions...

I shoot paper at indoor ranges. There are a few Bushnell's that are ok in the mid $100's. If you just want to be able to shoot, you can get a Ncstar for less than $100, or a BSA and be about the same price.

I can't say any of the budget scopes are great, but they do the job.

Again, all about budget and what you are trying to do. Just like our cars.
 

pro69

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Apr 7, 2005
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Reading,PA
All depends on how far out you want to reach accurately, and your budget.

By budget, meaning if you want to spend less than $100 and shoot at an indoor range, or have $1500 and want to shoot accurately to a few hundred yards... In low light conditions...

I shoot paper at indoor ranges. There are a few Bushnell's that are ok in the mid $100's. If you just want to be able to shoot, you can get a Ncstar for less than $100, or a BSA and be about the same price.

I can't say any of the budget scopes are great, but they do the job.

Again, all about budget and what you are trying to do. Just like our cars.
Would like to be able to shoot accurately in the 100-300 yard rang with the scope.I'll use the flip up iron sights for under 100 yards. Maybe under $250 or so,maybe a little higher. Also want to get a front grip and or bipod,unless there is 1 unit that can be used for both.
 
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