4.3L Vortec Block Limits

#21
I have one in the shop right now and doing the mock up on it. I was keeping it for another project. Should be a fun Spring if every thing works out right.
Bob
 

MCH86GN

Well-Known Member
#22
I have one in the shop right now and doing the mock up on it. I was keeping it for another project. Should be a fun Spring if every thing works out right.
Bob
Good luck, I almost bought a Typhoon but a couple people told me they were more expensive to upgrade than a GN. With the money I've spent on my GN, I could've bought both.

Do you on preparing the block so you can use 4 bolt mains?
 
#23
Yep,
It has caps already on it. Short block is ready to be put together. Just using it right now to mock up the Alum heads and Intake combo. Once that is complete. Give it a bath and put it together. Version 2.0 for the Lunch Money Syclone.
Bob
 
#24
Hopefully you know someone with a bowtie, I think they're very few left.
This is why a lot of guys go V8 and never look back, less fuel per cylinder to make the same usable power and less stress on the block. There's a pretty good video that was put out by Engine Masters asking a similar question as to how much boost can a stock production chevy block take/make, and they even use the stock cast bottom end for the bowtie engine. Not related to the Typhoon vortec block of course, but still pretty interesting nonetheless to see them throw down some pretty impressive numbers with a stock/junk short block....

 

MCH86GN

Well-Known Member
#25
This is why a lot of guys go V8 and never look back, less fuel per cylinder to make the same usable power and less stress on the block. There's a pretty good video that was put out by Engine Masters asking a similar question as to how much boost can a stock production chevy block take/make, and they even use the stock cast bottom end for the bowtie engine. Not related to the Typhoon vortec block of course, but still pretty interesting nonetheless to see them throw down some pretty impressive numbers with a stock/junk short block....

I've seen this episode. My answer to this is that I wanted a GN with the turbo v6. I looked around and saw some turbo V8 swaps, not necessarily in GNs, but they were out there and I hand the cash on hand to pick up a nice 80's Cutlass, SS Monte or Malibu.

From this episode's that I've seen on Engine Masters, they make sure the engine from a tuning standpoint had a nice margin of safety in their tunes, very similar to how Bison has his junk block tuned and making 679rwhp and 620 ft/lbs of torque. I think having a solid tune goes a long way with the durability of a block.

The turbo V6 is a nice family car to go driving around in.
 

marleyskater420

still needs to learn
#26
Ouch! Did/does it have a stock crank? Is there an aftermarket forged crank for the block? From my understanding, the block can be drilled such that it will support 4 bolt mains.

Interesting, I was talking about putting a girdle on my 3.8L block and one of the vendors on here said you'd be better off with a forged crank. At least for the 3.8L and 4.1L block, the forged cranks have came down in price quite a bit.

What turbo are you running? Do you have the stock intercooler setup or an aftermarket air to air IC?

Have you considered a chevy bowtie or are they too expensive or are your goals something else? As in getting the most out of the stock block?[/QUOTE

Our (RPS) crankshaft distributor is currently working on developing and producing a forged crankshaft for the 4.3 Sy/Ty blocks. There are a few things in the air at the moment, but the cost will be anywhere from $550-$1,200 I think.

Considering that other aftermarket Sy/Ty crankshafts START at $2,500 or so, do you think there would be much interest for a Sy/Ty forged crankshaft that costs up to $1,200? (Of course assuming that the design was good and it was a strong piece...)

What vendor told you that a crank is better than a girdle?

My buddy has Bison tune his car to about 520rwhp , and ran 10.3's with it. It was a 109 block, girdled (although I would say billet mains instead), stock crank, stock rods, and JE pistons I believe. My point is that with billet mains or a girdle it will help hold the crank in and help stop the flex. Although the forged crank is still much stronger, the center mains are still not very strong. I am saying all this in reference to an engine not making more than 650-700fwhp. This has been the experience of our local club member's engines with girdles vs caps vs aftermarket cranks.


Stock crank, good crank alot of money. All billet main caps. Stock/modded intercooler have an air to air not sure if I want to install it. 64/66 Gen 2 PTE Turbo with a buick flange and downpipe/external gate. Thinking about using turbo on my Buick and detune truck as it is a real PITA to work on.
Later,
Bob
My crank distributor recently told me that he is looking into having some Sy/Ty cranks made. Apparently there are a few things in the air at the moment which drastically affect the price, so he was telling me that they would be anywhere from $550-$1,200 a crank.

Just a heads up.
 

MCH86GN

Well-Known Member
#27
The vendor told me to use steel main caps and don't worry about a girdle. There was another guy on the board talking about when you have the mains up inside the skirt of the block, he doesn't see any point in a girdle. That girdles should be used on a Winsor type where mains come below the skirt. He's words not mine.
As I mentioned Bison has made 679rwhp/620ft-lbs of torque with a stock bottom on a 109 block.

Anyway, I hope that an affordable forged crank comes along for the Sy/Ty guys. Although if I were to get a nice stock example of either I would keep them stock. They're still quick as hell off the line.