oil priming tool??

rodman99999

Active Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2004
Does anyone manufacture an oil pump priming tool for our cars? They make one for Chevys that plug into the distributor hole, and then you attach a drill. Anything like that around for 3.8s, or do I have to make my own? ;)
 
same tool as the chevy 350 tool.. got mine from jegs catalog proform tool company...
 
Or you could get the loaner from autozone. But you have to take the guide off the end and grind the flat part down a little to get it to fit into the groove on the shaft.
 
disco stu said:
Or you could get the loaner from autozone. But you have to take the guide off the end and grind the flat part down a little to get it to fit into the groove on the shaft.

This is great advice and what I did recently with my prime after rebuild. Why would you want to buy one when you can borrow one free of charge? You will need a drill with cord to turn it appropriately. One other word of advice- when borrowing the tool, grab their sheet on counter and point to the picture of the prime tool and say "I want to borrow this one!" This will help get you out quicker!
 
Evans Ward said:
Why would you want to buy one when you can borrow one free of charge? !

because for say like $20 I would like it here and not have to keep borrowing it :eek:
 
rodman99999 said:
Does anyone manufacture an oil pump priming tool for our cars? They make one for Chevys that plug into the distributor hole, and then you attach a drill. Anything like that around for 3.8s, or do I have to make my own? ;)

I went to sears and spent a few dollars on a cheap fairly wide head and long flat head screw driver and took a flat punch and split the plastic and took the rod out. If you have a drill, the rest is easy. Cost me a few bucks and less than 5 minutes to break the plastic.
 
Grumpy said:
because for say like $20 I would like it here and not have to keep borrowing it :eek:

Understandable since you have 5 Turbo Buicks. Just one here so borrowing makes more sense for me. :D
 
Or you can take the shaft out of an old distributer -i think 1/2" in dia and use it in a drill-perfect.
 
Marc87GN said:
I went to sears and spent a few dollars on a cheap fairly wide head and long flat head screw driver and took a flat punch and split the plastic and took the rod out. If you have a drill, the rest is easy. Cost me a few bucks and less than 5 minutes to break the plastic.


I did the same thing. Just used an old screw driver though.

Andy
 
Grumpy said:
because for say like $20 I would like it here and not have to keep borrowing it :eek:
My sentiments exactly!! ;) Even though I had to drive out the pin, remove the guide collar, and relieve it to fit the oil pump shaft. Made in Taiwan- what a shock! :rolleyes: I gave the other ideas due consideration, I saved time(valuable to me) by spending the $20. :cool: Thanx guys!
 
They also sell the same tool. Can make one for cheaper, but if you don't have a dist. and you want one NOW it is a good deal.
 
49-blues said:
Or you can take the shaft out of an old distributer -i think 1/2" in dia and use it in a drill-perfect.

Yup, i knew there was a reason why i kept a few of those carb 87 na 3.8 distributors....

BW
 
Quick6'n'-K.C. said:
Yup, i knew there was a reason why i kept a few of those carb 87 na 3.8 distributors....

BW
Not to hyjack but are any of them pre computer?

Thanks,
 
THE cheapest way to make your own priming tool:

Find an old small block chevy distributor. Take the shaft out and cut the top off (advance weight end). Get a new plastic coupler for a sbc that couples the oil pump to the pump driveshaft and slip it over the end of the shaft and pin it in place.

Chuck the shaft in a 1/2 drill motor and prime yo engine.

I turned mine down in my lathe so I could chuck it in a 3/8 drill, but you don't need to do this if you have a 1/2 drill.
 
Second that one! Get an old distributor and just hacksaw away the body.

Rotate clockwise.

A screw driver in a drill chuck can work but if it slips out of the oil pump shaft slot you could mangle something. I never had good luck with power-driven flat head screwdrivers - they always slip. Not like a philips head.
 
used a dull 1/2" paddle bit (for wood) ground the tip off, then took a broken crapsman socket & welded it to it so it don't slip off the shaft.

cost 1" of wire in the welder, the rest was going in the trash anyway. ;)
 
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