Running 112 race gas all the time

cwelk87gn

XCELR8S
I am kicking around the idea of installing my 112 race gas chip, turning the boost up a bit and running race gas all the time. Here's the deal, The car stays under the cover in the garage most of the time and I probably drive it about once a week if that often. My question is this, since the car is rarely driven what are the disadvantages to using race fuel all the time ( aside from the cost)?;)
 
Burning out your O2s . Im using the Denso one right now with good results but all the time i think its still gonna killem .
 
Expense and O2's. And range, whereas you cant drive past a certain point, becuase of the availbility of the race gas.

Much easier solution.. on a bazillion Buicks..Alky.

Problem is you've tasted how the car runs on race gas and higher boost, and find yourself not enjoying it as much without the added octane..sounds familiar ;) , just thinking out loud.

But hey if you have access to the 55 gallon drums of 112 , and dont mind pumping/storing/transporting/expense...

So no downsides to running it on the car, the other issues are meerly financial and convenience.
 
When I drive my turbo Regal it isn't to go grocery shopping. Its pure driving exitement! So I use race gas all the time. Its not cheap at $4.50 per gallon for the 110 octane leaded fuel but it allows healthy boost without the fear of detonation and when I get on it the power it allows the motor to make never ceases to put a smile on my face. The O2 is the least of my concerns.
 
We're lucky enought to have a station that is local that sells 110. I drive the car about 1,000 - 1,500 miles per summer. I use a heated O2 sensor from John Spina and believe it or not, it usually lasts a year. I keep a second, new one handy and at the track I take out my "street" o2 sensor and put i the new one. I've been doing this for about 5 years.

What is nice, is the car runs in street form (BFG Drag Radials) exactly the way I race it at the track. The cost of the fuel and O2 is a small price to pay for all the thrills you'll have! I consider it a cheap form of therapy. Paul
 
Fuel

I run C-16 in both cars and at around $8.00 a gallon I feel safe when one of those 30+psi itches comes along.:D

Steve
 
xxxquickxxx

You are one of the smartest persons to show up here in a long time. Keep runing C-16, It' good for all the boost you can give it.
 
Originally posted by Razor
Expense and O2's. And range, whereas you cant drive past a certain point, becuase of the availbility of the race gas.

Much easier solution.. on a bazillion Buicks..Alky.

Problem is you've tasted how the car runs on race gas and higher boost, and find yourself not enjoying it as much without the added octane..sounds familiar ;) , just thinking out loud.

But hey if you have access to the 55 gallon drums of 112 , and dont mind pumping/storing/transporting/expense...

So no downsides to running it on the car, the other issues are meerly financial and convenience.

I have to agree with tasting the power of race gas.:D And also the Alky is a great idea as well.

One more down side is the lead coats the spark plugs. Some say after 150-200 miles you could use a new set for ultimate performance.
 
Let's see.

Let's say you drive 1,000 miles per year.

You have a heavy foot and average 10 MPG.

That's 100 gallons at $8.00 per gallon or $800.

2,000 miles = $1,600

3,000 miles = $2,400

Yikes!!!

You're the man!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:D
 
Re: xxxquickxxx

Originally posted by MOREBOOST
You are one of the smartest persons to show up here in a long time. Keep runing C-16, It' good for all the boost you can give it.

Believe it or not, on my own car I cant but run 24-25 PSI on C16 due to the air restrictions in place cuasing the air to stack up and get heated beyond what octane can do...aka stock IC, TB, heads,cam etc.. On alky i've blown past 30 PSI and no KR. As long as air temps are down from bigger turbo, bigger IC, increased flow, etc.. yup C16 will handle the octane part no problemo. But once you get intake temps past 200 degrees..at high boost..its gets a little hard. Considering you also run a high timing chip to burn that C16. So couple high timing with high intake air temps..you see that there are limits. ;)

Cheers
 
c-16

You answered your own problem, heat it is not the fault of the fuel. Get all your problems addressed, then add fuel. I have Dayco 108 work fine at 35lbs. of boost. But that is only my senario. All motors are different as you must know. The chemestry in C-16 is designed for Blown and Turbo applications.
 
Chris, I know a speed shop that sells it in Milton, but I don't know of any in Mobile. Richard (69Nova) from the GCM board recently bought a whole barrel of the stuff and he lives in Mobile. I'm sure he'd sell some of it. It's 7.50 a gallon here. It's made by VP Racing Fuels. I believe it's really 117 motor octane IIRC. Some really good smelling and potent stuff. :p
 
MOREBOOST, I whole heartedly agree with you 100%. Heat is not the fuel's fault. Its inadequate IC, turbo, etc.

And not all cars like c16.. it takes a lot of timing to burn that stuff. Mild cars run better on less like C12 which is of lesser octane, and doesnt have the same timing requirments.

A person has to address what the issues of his or her combo is, then decide what steps are needed.

Only reason I threw in my .02 was due to a comment, yeah throw all the boost you want at C16.. only if temps are addressed.. it is part of a way larger scheme of things.

Combination, combination, combination.. these are the keys to going fast.
 
i run turbo blue all the time with a caspers O2 i've had for a year and a half with no problems. plus the race gas smell is way cool.
 
Timing?

High octane fuel, in general, does not REQUIRE more timing. It might tolerate more, but it should not need more. There are a lot of people who mistakenly think that high octane fuel burns more slowly, and that has been spread around on the internet, even though it is not correct. Here is a quote, originally from Popular Hot Rodding:

"The burn rate of a fuel is a measurement of the time required
for complete combustion of the air/fuel mixture. The notion that octane ratings affect the burn rate of fuel is about 180-degrees from reality;
bum rate is a function of several variables, and the two are completely independent, although there is generally a correlation between octane ratings and bum rates.

To give you a good example of this, we contacted Jim Wurth from
Sunoco Race Fuels. He explains, "A perfect example is Sunoco Maximal,which is our fastest burning fuel, and coincidentally one of Sunoco'shighest octane fuels at 116 (R+M) / 2. A lot of Pro Stock teams rely on Maximal for those sub-seven second runs. When they are turning 9,000 rpm or more, the fuel has to burn pretty quickly to achieve complete combustion."

So, maybe try a little less timing, see how it works.
 
If i could run C-16 all the time i would theres nothing like it,and dont you just love that sweet smell that it gives off:) So you go through more O2 sensors its well worth it.
 
Race gas only.

I agree with everyone about running it all the time, it's awesome the only bad thing is you need to add a little lubricant like marvel mystery oil or Klotz's Uplon fuel lube to the gas cause it rust's the hell out of the inside of the heads and the exhaust housing on the turbo's, downpipes and exhaust systems if there not stainless.
 
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