New engine/trans procedure

Turbo6Smackdown

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2005
Ok, I have a new Lonnie Diers engine and trans combo in my car yet. It has not yet been started. What checks can a person in my situation go thru, to decrease the possibilities of breaking something.
 
Call Lonnie and ask him what he suggests. Not sure what exactly you want to check/do? And what is your "situation"? No arms, no legs? Blind? Stationed at the South Pole? Living in a cardboard box? Just joking, but, what advice are you looking for? Installation tips, tools, or adjustments to the new engine? Are you installing it yourself? :)
 
I got the break in tips I needed from Lonnie. I was just wondering if there was any other tip that installers utilize, to help increase their chances of success.
Like other checks you can do, after you get the engine from the builder.
 
Personally, I don't trust anyone. I will always tear it apart and check all clearances. Nothing against Lonnie. (never met or talked with him) But, I work in the aviation world were everything is supposed to be double/triple checked. We still get $750,000 black boxes that "smoke" on install. Too many things can be overlooked in an engine. But.......If you are not well versed in engine assembly or do not have the proper tools to measure everything, I would still pull the valve covers and verify valve adjustment, and then pour alot of good lube on the rocker arms (stockers) and make sure the valve cover gaskets are glued to the valve cover. Take a flashlite and check the intake end seals to make sure they are sealed tight, re-torque the head gaskets with the valve cover off. (loosen each bolt one at a time and re-torque with a good torque wrench), check intake bolts for proper torque, check cam thrust (roller cam), verifiy crank thrust is with in spec., make sure new freeze plugs were installed, check oil pugs in the back of the block, Verify the oil pan gasket is a cork one, not rubber. Check running torque with a torque wrench to make sure it's not too tight, though it will have considerable drag depending on hone and ring package. 'Bout all I can think about right now. Good luck with your new engine.:smile:
 
Yea... I know some of that stuff, but frankly, I don't have those tools. I mean, I can get a torque wrench but, I guess I'm just freaked out about debris. That's my main worry. Well, that and bearing tolerances. I'm ocd...
 
Personally, I don't trust anyone. I will always tear it apart and check all clearances. Nothing against Lonnie. (never met or talked with him) But, I work in the aviation world were everything is supposed to be double/triple checked. We still get $750,000 black boxes that "smoke" on install. Too many things can be overlooked in an engine. But.......If you are not well versed in engine assembly or do not have the proper tools to measure everything, I would still pull the valve covers and verify valve adjustment, and then pour alot of good lube on the rocker arms (stockers) and make sure the valve cover gaskets are glued to the valve cover. Take a flashlite and check the intake end seals to make sure they are sealed tight, re-torque the head gaskets with the valve cover off. (loosen each bolt one at a time and re-torque with a good torque wrench), check intake bolts for proper torque, check cam thrust (roller cam), verifiy crank thrust is with in spec., make sure new freeze plugs were installed, check oil pugs in the back of the block, Verify the oil pan gasket is a cork one, not rubber. Check running torque with a torque wrench to make sure it's not too tight, though it will have considerable drag depending on hone and ring package. 'Bout all I can think about right now. Good luck with your new engine.:smile:

No offense, but I see that as a BAD idea...If I built your motor (not that I build motors, this is more of a business owners example) and you took it apart and put it back together before using it, and it broke...I wouldn't do **** for you, it would be your baby from then on.
 
Yea... I know some of that stuff, but frankly, I don't have those tools. I mean, I can get a torque wrench but, I guess I'm just freaked out about debris. That's my main worry. Well, that and bearing tolerances. I'm ocd...

The whole point of having someone like Lonnie put your motor together is so you know that someone who knows what they are doing did it, that's what you are paying for...Don't go back over their work.

All you can do is make sure your end is correct, and watch your temps and oil pressure as it warms up the 1st time...If you see something wrong SHUT IT OFF IMMEDIATELY, and call the guy you paid to put it together.
 
yes

No offense, but I see that as a BAD idea...If I built your motor (not that I build motors, this is more of a business owners example) and you took it apart and put it back together before using it, and it broke...I wouldn't do **** for you, it would be your baby from then on.

I agree--that's what you paid good $ for.
 
I agree with Ken on this one...

it isnt anybodys responsibility but your own to confirm the item is ready for use. as most machine shops will tell you, warrenty ends as soon as it leaves the driveway.

Engine builders arent robots, and mistakes are made. ive found rags under intakes, little bits of the end of a silicone tube, the tiny bits of safety wire from the camshaft bolts, the tear off end of the comp cams lube packet.. etc etc.

while you may not completely dissasemble the motor... it wouldnt hurt to take a GOOD look inside.

A.j.
 
So I see from that thread, that I'm not the only one that this happens to. MAN I feel sorry for that guy! Personally, I'd be over there with a baseball bat and my Sig 9mm.

As for Lonnie. If there's anything wrong, it was because he overlooked something. And if he did, he'd fix it free. I'm not worried about that. Lonnies a good guy. I'm just worried about debris... Ah well, nothing I can do now lol. Gonna fire it up and go. :)
 
You will not see any of that hack from one of Lonnie's engines. I'd get it started and do a few oil changes before you hammer on it.
 
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