old school hot rodding tricks

Little6pack

Active Member
Some of you guys have not been around for some of the crazy things people use to do. I am sure there are some that also include the new generation.

If you have any OLD or NEW to share add them.


I remember old hot rodders saying they would add Marvel Mystery Oil to the crankcase.. WTF did that DO? except empty your wallet.

here is a few more

Flipping your GM carb aircleaner lid backwards to let more air into the filter increases HP!
All I recall that did was make the enginge sound louder.

Bleed off vacum to the th350 & th400's auto tranny's vacum controller with pinhole so it would make the trans rev and shift hard.
This method sucked in traffic cause you had to rev the pizz out of your engine to get it to shift.

Painting the undersides of Old school cars ALL white would reduce heat & lower a 10th in quartermile. NOT!
 
-Like stickers add horsepower!?
-masking tape on the jambs/hood and bumper joints makes you run faster times?(because there can't be driver error!)
-running the a/c makes engine temps drop in the staging lanes (forget runnning the engine adds the heat more than the a/c can drop it)-
 
-Like stickers add horsepower!?
:D


-masking tape on the jambs/hood and bumper joints makes you run faster times?(because there can't be driver error!)
I seen guys remove wipers, mirrors, etc

-running the a/c makes engine temps drop in the staging lanes (forget runnning the engine adds the heat more than the a/c can drop it)-

Ok maybe the AC make the DRIVER COOLER so he can focus on the TREE :biggrin:

I have heard about some guy pumping an AC duct to his Aircleaner for cool air LOL
 
uncorking exhausts. (if you have cutouts)

cardboard and tape, block the grille openings and headlight openings (seemed to work OK)

if youve a pick up or elky/ranchero, tailgate removal or put it down, supposedly to pick up time

not necessarily for racing; but looking cool...

flip your steelies inside out and chrome them (applicable only to those that could be used either way....modern steelies, read, 70s onward didnt quite work that way)

knock off wheels. (single nut retaining system) Apparently used in Indy, but deemed undesirable or illegal in some parts of the US....still lives on with Daytons wire wheels for the lowrider set.

painting fades to take care of rock chips and similar damage to the custom mixed paint. (Gene Winfred or something, did this to many of his show cars in the 60s)

here's another one.....

clearcoat over sponsor decals and wet sanding it to have no edges...done in the days before wraps became affordable lol.

solid flat tappet lifters for hairy cams

OH YEAH....

primer black everything; letting your rod rust a little bit, not taking care of the finish, but letting it get oxidized an so on in the name of "patina"

not painting or taking care of surface rust, just so it could be counted as a "rat" rod jalopy.
 
Flipping your GM carb aircleaner lid backwards to let more air into the filter increases HP!
All I recall that did was make the enginge sound louder.

That does work (at least on my car it did) because I've owned a car that I could flip the lid and it would out run my other car. Flip it back and it lost.:D TRUE STORY:eek:
 
hello people; I'm no old time hot rodder by any means but I saw a show (I think on speed vision) where this guy would acid dip his cars body parts to lighten them up but still look stock. Pretty slick.
IBBY
 
PUMP front tires to 55psi

Actually I have done this one at the drags and forgot on ride home to undo. :eek:

That works too....less rolling resistance.:D


hello people; I'm no old time hot rodder by any means but I saw a show (I think on speed vision) where this guy would acid dip his cars body parts to lighten them up but still look stock. Pretty slick.
IBBY

My round track racing buddy done that to a set of stock SB350 heads. Larger ports but no sanding marks should they needed to be checked by officials.;)
 
When I round track raced an old 81 regal w sbc I had in the 10 lap street spectator events, I put my drag radials on one side of the car. It was like magic watching that boat run thru the corners and not spin out.:D
 
* Install air shocks to jack up car for bigger tires (classic)

* Run no air cleaner at all

* Tilt front ends for engine access or just because it was cool,steel or fiberglass

* Convert power steering to manual

* Vertical gate 4 speed shifter on street car

* Install gear drive timing set for the "blower" sound

Some not common but I saw:

* Painting car with housepaint, applied with brush or roller, then washed with water and SOS pads

* Drive 4 speed car with linkage only ( no money for shifter)

* Use drain oil (those who worked in "service" gas stations )in an oil burner car, some a quart or more a day!
 
actually, flipping the air cleaner lid does help on some cars.. mostly on the big blocks that were forced to breathe thru the 1.5" hole on the end of the snorkel..
this same theory also works on more modern cars with choked off air boxes- i gained a couple of mpg and a little seat of the pants power in my 94 Caprice by hacking open the airbox and removing the stock baffle. plus, it sounded cooler..

i'm surprised no one mentioned my favorite old school go fast idea of all time- the "3/4 race cam".. couple that with a set of camel back heads (on a 327 Chevy, of course..), and you were unbeatable..
 
Smokey Yunick old school 7/8ths cars. They were 7/8th the size of their production counterpart. This is the reason the bodies are checked with the jibs....methinks he almost got away with that.
 
Ahh...he did the acid dipping too. Good read. He was the godfather of "tips"

As with most successful racers, Yunick was a master of the grey area straddling the rules. Perhaps his most famous exploit was his #13 1966 Chevrolet Chevelle, driven by Curtis Turner. The car was so much faster than the competition during testing that they were certain that cheating was involved; some sort of aerodynamic enhancement was strongly suspected, but the car's profile seemed to be entirely stock, as the rules required. It was eventually discovered that Yunick had lowered and modified the roof and windows and raised the floor (to lower the body) of the production car. Since then, NASCAR required each race car's roof, hood, and trunk to fit templates representing the production car's exact profile.

Another Yunick improvisation was getting around the regulations specifying a maximum size for the fuel tank, by using eleven foot (three meter) coils of 2-inch (5-centimeter) diameter tubing for the fuel line to add about 5 gallons (19 liters) to the car's fuel capacity. Once, NASCAR officials came up with a list of nine items for Yunick to fix before the car would be allowed on the track. The suspicious NASCAR officials had removed the tank for inspection. Yunick started the car with no gas tank and said "Better make it ten,"[2] and drove it back to the pits. He used a basketball in the fuel tank which could be inflated when the car's fuel capacity was checked and deflated for the race.

Yunick also used such innovations as offset chassis, raised floors, roof spoilers, nitrous oxide injection, and other modifications often within the letter of the rule-book, if not the spirit. "All those other guys were cheatin' 10 times worse than us," Yunick wrote in his autobiography, "so it was just self-defense." Yunick's success was also due to his expertise in the aerodynamics of racing cars.

Yunick also built a 1968 Camaro for Trans-Am racing. Although Yunick set several speed and endurance records with the car at Bonneville Speedway, with both a 302 cubic inch (~4942 cubic centimeter) and a 396 cubic inch (~6489 cubic centimeter) engine, it never won a race while Yunick owned it. It was later sold to Don Yenko, who did win several races. In typical Yunick fashion, the car, although superficially a stock Camaro, had acid-dipped body panels and thinner window glass to reduce weight, the front end of the body tilted downwards and the windshield laid back for aerodynamics, all four fenders widened, the front subframe Z'ed and the floorpan moved up to lower the car, and many other detailed modifications. The drip rails were even brought closer to the body for a tiny aerodynamic improvement. A connector to the engine oil system was extended into the car's interior, to allow the driver to add oil from a pressurized hose during pit stops. In order to allow the driver enough freedom of movement, the shoulder harness was modified to include a cable-ratchet mechanism from a military helicopter. In 1993, Vic Edelbrock, Jr. purchased and restored the car. Contrary to popular opinion, Yunick designed the first "safe wall" in the early 1960s using old tires between sheets of plywood but NASCAR did not adopt his idea. Also Yunick developed air jacks for stock cars in 1961 but NASCAR didn't deem them appropriate.
 
That does work (at least on my car it did) because I've owned a car that I could flip the lid and it would out run my other car. Flip it back and it lost.:D TRUE STORY:eek:

Heck yea, that is the first thing I learned right there:biggrin:

It did sound alot better too;)
 
I’m not old at all but I have heard that guys would acid dip the roof or body. i also heard that guys would cheat by putting a 30 pound helmet in the car when they would weight them in.
 
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